Nihao, Chongqing.

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We’ve officially been in China for two weeks and my head is definitely still spinning.

In a nutshell…the city is huge, the food is spicy, the weather is very hot, I am still processing a lot of information from our orientation, I start teaching next week, I also start my own classes next week, I optimistically joined a gym…and…that’s it so far.

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Though we have been spending most of our time working, settling in, and trying to prepare for classes, we have tried to get out and explore this gigantic city a bit.  We walked through the Expo Gardens (didn’t even scratch the surface on that place) for a bit of exercise one afternoon and we recently took a taxi into the city center to get a feel for some of the main squares.

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I am very happy to report that I LOVE our new apartment and there is plenty to do in our neighborhood, including a fabulous gym and a great local cafe that sells good coffee and craft beers.  It’s only a five minute walk to grab groceries, which is LIFE-CHANGING after living in the middle of nowhere in Turkey.

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It is still taking some time to get used to everything being unfamiliar again.  The language, culture, and landscape are all still alien to me, so I am looking forward to getting to know it all better.

Here’s to a new adventure.

 

Another American Summer

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Kansas sunsets really are the prettiest.

Greetings from China!

Yes, we are here and settling in, but before I talk about that, I feel compelled to talk about our hectic, brief summer in the U.S.

We knew this summer would be unpredictable.  International moves always are.  I’ve learned by now that the visa process is usually one big question mark until it isn’t.  It makes it difficult to plan much because everything has to revolve around the visa timeline and (of course!) you can’t make appointments.

Amidst the chaos of moving from Turkey to the U.S. and then packing again for China, 5 weeks of rapid couchsurfing around Kansas, and going to Chicago for our visas, we did manage to enjoy ourselves a bit.

Indulge me as I go through the highlight reel:

img_20190801_134339Hanging out with my grandma’s adorable cats!

img_20190801_134316Eating my grandma’s peanut butter pie!

img_20190710_150803Enjoying a beautiful Chicago summer with my partner in crime while we waited for our visas to be processed

img_20190711_130659Trying aerial yoga for the first time (loved it!)

 

img_20190723_155126Childhood treats

img_20190726_115942Reminiscing

img_20190727_192935_1Drinking wine in the Flint Hills

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Drinking more wine…this time from the wine box we sealed at our wedding.  As it was our 5th wedding anniversary, we got to open this bottle and replace it with another (to be opened on our 10th.)

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Saying goodbye (for now) to the U.S. and hello (or nihao, rather) to a new adventure.

 

So there you have it.  A very brief recap of an all-too-brief summer.  More to come on China soon!

Görüşürüz, Türkiye.

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As I type this, I am sitting in my grandmother’s air conditioned house on a hot Kansas afternoon, trying to find the right words.  To be honest, I still haven’t processed it all yet.  Leaving Turkey felt like stepping through a portal from one universe to another.  There is a piece of me that still thinks it will all be there waiting for me exactly as I left it, even though my head knows I won’t be going back for quite some time.

I didn’t sleep the night before I left.  The day was filled with tearful goodbyes to students, colleagues, and dear friends, followed by an epic Turkish party at night.  We were packing until the very last second.  I wouldn’t have left any other way.

I am so tremendously thankful for the memories, the people, and the life-changing experiences.

Her şey için teşekkürler, Türkiye.  Sizi özleyeceğim.

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Notes from the Happiest Country on Earth

img_20190605_173151-1We had one last vacation on our calendar this school year – the bayram, marking the end of Ramadan.  This, we knew, would be our last vacation in Europe for a while.  We had considered staying in Turkey, but because it was a holiday, the prices were outrageous and we figured most cities would be quite crowded.  Instead, we opted for a quick getaway to Copenhagen.

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We did not want to do too much to be honest, as we have been doing practically nothing but packing lately.  We decided not to make any specific plans and just wander around the city at our leisure.

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We got extremely lucky with the weather.  So lucky, in fact, that I managed to get sunburnt.  We spent the first day wandering the adorable streets, grabbing a quick dinner, checking out the craft beer scene, and trying to avoid being run over by crazy cyclists.

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On our second day, we made the trek out to Reffen, a very awesome, very hipster food paradise full of little stalls with everything from Mexican to Nepalese food.  We tried just about everything we had room for and all of it was spectacular.

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Day 3 was rainy and a bit cold, so we spent most of our time wandering a new neighborhood and taking shelter in random cafes.  We were both perfectly content to reflect on our travels in Europe these past four years while sipping on espressos and people watching.

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It doesn’t surprise me one bit that people in Denmark are so happy.  Good food everywhere, Aperol Spritz parties in the streets, solid emphasis on regular physical activity (bicycles everywhere!), and whimsical buildings.

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Although I am looking forward to a change, I will certainly miss being so close to Europe.  Quaint streets, punctuality, organization, charming architecture, amazing wine…what’s not to love?

 

Reflections

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Super duper jet-lagged baby expats!

Here I am, down to less than a month in this place that has been my home for four years.  Four years goes by fast.

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4 years later, learning to blend in

I have already started packing and downsizing.  My upstairs neighbors (a.k.a the dorm girls) gleefully took several bags of clothes off of my hands.  I am done planning lessons for the year.  My exams are printed and ready.  Not much is left to do here but prepare to say goodbye.

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I know I haven’t written much this year.  I haven’t felt very inspired. The last year and a half or so in Turkey has been a little rough – ever since the economic downturn and resultant chaos at our school took its toll.  We are leaving a little burnt out, but I don’t want what has happened at the end to tarnish four years of amazing memories.

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I’ve been taking all the photos off of our computers and hard drives and organizing them to prepare for the next big move.  Looking through them, I can see how much we have grown.  We haven’t aged much (we both look young for our age), but there is a difference in our eyes.  I came here as a fresh new teacher, naive and ready for adventure; I am leaving this place a wiser, savvier, stronger, braver, more worldly and more confident person than I ever believed I could be when I first stepped off of that plane.

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When I really reflect, all I can feel is gratitude.  I am ten times the teacher I was when I first came thanks to the experiences I had here.  I know I can step into my next position with confidence.  I got to work with incredible students that I love dearly and will keep in touch with for years to come.  I made amazing friends – who are really more like family at this point- without whom I never would have survived as an expat.   I learned how to operate with a new set of rules in a new culture and learned a new language to boot.  I traveled to over 30 countries on three different continents with the love of my life.

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Yes, I am happy to be leaving.  I am ready to move on.  But I will always be grateful we said yes to Turkey, even when many people thought we were crazy.  I could not have asked for a more beautiful country, full of countless treasures and wonders, with amazing food, and more importantly, amazing people to begin this journey I have always dreamed of.

11218870_1660003807547814_8920917322430442324_nThese last few weeks are going to be emotional, if you couldn’t tell.

 

I Will Miss You

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As of today, I have approximately 55 days left in Turkey.  Holy crap.

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The countdown is starting to feel real.  Like, really real.  As excited as I am to start a new life in China, leaving Turkey is going to leave a bit of a simit-shaped hole in my heart.  I have made so many wonderful friends here who have really become like my family and have been by my side through everything from economic crisis and culture shock to Turkish miracles and breathtaking travel moments.  Saying goodbye won’t be easy.

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I have been a bit of a hermit this year.  Our trips have been a little lackluster compared to previous years and more than that, I think we have just gotten a little tired.  Living on a little rock by the sea in the middle of nowhere can make you feel a little burnt out and lethargic after four years, I suppose.  I’ve been venturing into Istanbul less and less, but one of my dearest friends managed to pull me out of my cave this weekend.

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I couldn’t restrain myself from taking a bite before taking a picture.

First up was a delicious Mexican dinner, which is a big deal in Turkey because it is hard to find Mexican food here – especially good Mexican food.  These enchiladas were the real deal.

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This was her first time trying margaritas.  She approved.

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The next day, we ventured all the way out to Beykoz to go to a super hipster BYOB old shoe factory-turned-movie-theatre that plays cool old films and cult classics.  To get there, you have to take a special golf cart with security because the road is lined with active movie sets for Turkish series and films.

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Here is the oh-so-comfy movie theatre.  Not pictured: mulled wine in a coffee cup.  We watched Tokyo Godfathers, which was amazing.

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After our movie and some lunch, we headed over to Beşiktaş to see Luke Jerram’s Museum of the Moon exhibit, as well as a few other pieces at the Ferriye museum.

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I really liked this CGI interpretation of the Last Supper

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The sunset over Ortaköy was otherworldly.

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The next morning, after brunch, my friend convinced me that it would be awesome if we both got our ears pierced on a whim.  So that happened.

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As I hopped on the bus to head back to my rock by the sea, the thought that kept running through my head was I’ll miss you.  Istanbul, my friends, the seaside, my village home, all of it.

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Egypt: desert, sea, and…frequent frustration

IMG_20190126_202502_195I’m sitting down to write this and I honestly still don’t know how to describe how I feel about Egypt.  Did I hate it?  No…but I didn’t love it either and I so desperately wanted to.  Ever since I was a little girl, I was fascinated with the wonders of Ancient Egypt:  heiroglyphics, the pyramids, papyrus, and the Rosetta Stone.  The thought of finally seeing it all for myself was thrilling and dizzying.  If only the reality had lived up to the expectations.

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We started our journey in Hurghada, a beach town known for its amazing coral reefs in the Red Sea.  Flights between Hurghada and Istanbul are cheap and the thought of some sunshine was welcome.  We booked a resort (which is pretty much your only good option in Hurghada) and prepared ourselves for a relaxing few days by the beach for the start of our trip.  If only.

IMG-20190120-WA0001Our first couple of days in Hurghada were alright.  The weather was great, the water was beautiful, and our room was comfortable enough.  On the other hand, the internet was non-existent, even if you paid a little extra for faster connection.  The food ranged from inedible to mediocre.  Attempting to lounge on a sunbed (which was the whole reason we wanted to go to Hurghada) felt less like a leisure activity and more like a game of whack-a-mole, as a whole slew of salesmen crowded along what was supposed to be a private beach trying to sell you tours.  At first, I just tossed on my sunglasses and pretended to be sleeping so they would leave me alone, but many of them still continued to loom over me and scream at me in various languages until I told them to piss off.  Not exactly a relaxing experience.  But these were the least of our problems in Hurghada.

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After a couple of days of attempting to relax in the sunshine, we decided to book a short day trip from one of the hotel’s on-site tour operators – a quad bike tour of the Sahara Desert.  Sounds awesome, right?

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In the beginning, it really was.  It was exhilarating to speed through the sand dunes under the sun with great views of the desert mountains.  I thought I had finally found the vacation I was looking for.  This quickly turned sour at the halfway point (about 40 km in) of the tour when we were guided to a small Bedouin village for a camel ride and tea and shisha.  The camel ride was essentially a one-minute walk in a circle, hardly worth the effort of mounting and dismounting.  We spent about ten minutes actually enjoying the tea before they quickly rushed us away to try to sell us random souvenirs and natural medicines.  By the time we finished, the sun was starting to set, meaning we had 40 km to go….in the dark.  As it turns out, my quad bike had no tail lights and my husband’s had no headlights.  When we pointed this out to the tour operator, he just laughed and said “yeah, that’s not a good bike to choose for nighttime,” as if he hadn’t been the one to assign us bikes.  We were terrified the whole time.  We could barely follow the guide and had no way to see if we were going to hit any rocks or bumps.  It was terrifying and frankly dangerous.  Strike two for Egypt.

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This was okay though…because I had an awesome tour planned for the following day that I had booked a month in advance and it had great reviews on TripAdvisor.  The thing I wanted to see most in Egypt (aside from the Pyramids, of course) was the Valley of the Kings and the Temple of Karnak.  As misfortune would have it, I got an email that night that our tour had been canceled due to safety issues and we could decide whether or not we wanted to schedule a different day.  Exhausted and frustrated, we decided to sleep on it and see if we could work something out.  4 A.M. rolls around – we get a call from the front desk.

“Your bus is waiting for you.”

Confused, we asked to speak with the tour operator.  We explained that we had been told the trip was canceled due to safety reasons.  He said we were mistaken – there were no safety issues.  The problem was that we had been the only English speakers to sign up for that day and it would be more convenient to move us to another date, but we could join a non-English tour if we desired.

I. Was. Livid.  First of all, I had booked a month in advance!  Secondly, I had just been lied to about safety, all so they could save a few bucks!  I told them not to bother and that I had no interest dealing with their sleazy tour company anymore and that I expected a full refund.  They said I would have to cancel through the website (again, a lie), so I’m still dealing with that mess as I write this.

At that point, I was so furious and hated Egypt so much I just wanted to turn around and go home.  But…the Pyramids.

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I hoped with all my heart that Cairo would turn things around for me.  For the most part, it did.  We stayed in Giza in a room with a view of the Pyramids and that managed to cheer us both up a bit.  Better yet, the food at that hotel was much better than the garbage we had encountered in Hurghada.  Nobody harassed me or tried to sell me anything.  Finally, some peace.

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We booked a private tour of the Great Pyramids through our hotel, which turned out to be the best experience of the whole trip.  Our tour guide was awesome, professional, and made our visit to the Pyramids a great experience.  This, I can recommend.  If you don’t go with a tour guide, expect to spend a long time in line and to be hassled frequently.

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As our time in Egypt came to an end, I felt apprehensive about leaving Cairo.  We were flying out of Sharm el Sheikh – another beach town- and I didn’t want to suffer through Hurghada all over again.

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Thankfully, the resort in Sharm was vastly more professional than the one in Hurghada, and we could indeed enjoy time on the white sand beach undisturbed.  On the downside, my husband did get food poisoning there, but managed to recover quickly enough to make our flight home.  Also, a guy selling trinkets at the airport tried to pretend I hadn’t already paid him when I tried to buy a bracelet on the way out.  Not cool.

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So is Egypt worth it?  I can’t say I regret having gone. I’m very glad I saw the Pyramids – that was truly an awesome experience.  On the other hand, I was so disappointed in the the way I was treated pretty much the whole time everywhere else.  It is disheartening because I know Egypt desperately needs tourists to help boost their economy, but in this regard, I must say they are not doing themselves any favors.

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Veni, vidi, vici, I suppose.

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